Rain Working: Meditation

As we count down the days to the end of 2014, and give thanks for the rains that have come, we look forward and call for the spring rains. 

A Spellbook for the Bringing Forth of the Inundation by HiC Luttmers

This work is dedicated with gratitude to the beneficence of Khnum and Hapi

Introduction

While many spells are conceived and utilised on a personal level, this spell was originally conceived as a way of doing something for the greater good that would benefit the lives and well-being of a group of people rather than just an individual. After three years of drought, California is in serious and desperate need of an abundant rain season, an inundation of water that might flow across its lands to replenish, refresh and renourish the land and its people. Therefore, this spell was brought about in order to call upon the great netjer of the Nile and the Inundation, Hapi, as well as the mighty netjer of the potter’s wheel, Khnum, who oversees the source of the Nile and, therefore, the source of the waters which flow forth into the Nile and cover the lands during the inundation.

This spell can be adapted by the practitioner for use on a more personal level by envisioning the flow and inundation of that which the practitioner feels is lacking or is needed in his or her life, such as health, prosperity, love, etc. Adaptations would need to be made (and are encouraged), especially in the last portion of the spell, to direct the spell towards that which is being sought.

Suggestions have been made regarding items needed during the ritual as well as altar placement. The spell has been written to be performed by multiple people, with roles for Priest 1 as Khnum and Priest 2 as Hapi, with the rest of the participants serving as a sort of chorus. However, this spell can certainly be performed by one individual.

My hope is that this spell will be something that can be of aid and benefit to the one and to the all in maintaining proper and constant flow in life and in the world, so that all that is needed may flow forth freely and abundantly, maintaining and returning an individual’s situation, a group’s situation or the world’s situation to alignment with Ma’at in all things, in all ways and in all times.

May Khnum set in motion and Hapi bring forth an inundation of blessings into your life and world !

Items Needed

Blue altar cloth

Khnum image

Black candle

Hapi Image

Blue, blue-green, or turquoise candle

Earthenware jar or vase

Fountain

Large bowl

Blue bowl (small enough to be set in the larger bowl)

Papyrus & Lotus

String to tie them together

Stones corresponding to purpose of ritual (at least one for each participant), such as :

Turquoise for physical healing, rain

Carnelian for emotional/sexual healing, protection, perception, inspiration

Lapis for wisdom, intuition, psychic stimulation

Citrine for prosperity

(This is just a sampling, feel free to use stones that correspond to your purpose)

White candle

Blue bottle, one for each participant

Abundant offerings of meats and grains and breads

Altar Setup

The altar faces South. The altar is setup in such a way that there are three levels. A blue altar cloth flows over and down from one level to the next. Abundant offerings of meats, grains, breads are placed on each level (if possible, otherwise on each side of the altar surrounding the images and bowls.

Altar : Upper Level

On the upper level, centre, is an image of Khnum. A black candle is placed in front of image.

Altar : Middle Level

On the middle level, is an image of Hapi. A blue, blue-green or turquoise candle is placed in front of image. To the left of the image is placed an earthenware jar or vase filled with water (large enough to hold enough water to fill both the smaller and larger bowls combined). A fountain is placed to the right of the Hapi image. If an image of Hapi is not available, then one suggestion might be to use the fountain as the “image” placed in the centre of the second level.

Altar : Lower Level

On the lower level, in front of Hapi is the bowl within a bowl arrangement. A white candle is placed in front of the bowl.

The bowl within a bowl

A large bowl, preferably rectangular in shape, is placed with one of the shorter ends towards the image of Hapi. The smaller blue bowl is placed within the larger bowl nearer the end by the image of Hapi. Pieces of turquoise (or whatever stone has been chosen) line the bottom of the larger bowl.

On either side of the bowl are the papyrus and the lotus. A white candle is placed in front of the bowl.

Everyone says :

From the Primeval Ocean of Nun flowed forth the mighty Nile.

Though rarely do You, Nun, leave your cavernous residence, as you did in Zep Tepi to bring forth creation,

We come before you as did the grand assembly of the netjeru, to summon you forth

as did the decree, signed by Ra,

summon you forth.

The whole of creation is indebted to you

for your good services.

Ma’at is imperilled,

so we do summon you forth.1

Priest 1, as Khnum, stands before the altar and says :

I am Khnum,

Netjer of the Cataract

and guardian of the sources of the Nile.2

Priest 1 lights the candle in front of Khnum then says :

I am acting in accordance with the command of Amun-Ra,

Lord of the Netjeru.

Just as His name is perfect as god,

so His thought is effective.3

May my thoughts, words and actions be effective.

Everything He says comes into being immediately.4

So may my every word and action come into being immediately.

Everyone says :

Our thoughts, words and actions are effective.

Our words and actions come into being immediately.

Priest 1, as Khnum, stands before the altar and says :

I am master of creation.

I, myself, have created the great ocean which came into being in past times,

according to whose pleasure the Nile rises.

For I am the master who makes,

I am he who makes himself exalted in Nun,

who first came forth,

Hapi who hurries at will.5

Everyone says :

Hail to You, O Nile !

Who manifests Yourself over this land,

and comes to give life to this land !

Come and prosper !

Come and prosper !

O Nile, come and prosper !

O you who make men to live through his flocks

and his flocks through his orchards !

Come and prosper,

come, O Nile,

come and prosper !6

Priest 2, as Hapi, stands before the altar and says :

I am Hapi,

who comes forth from Hep,

and lives in the great cave of the first Cataract.

Priest 2 lights the candle in front of Hapi and says :

I am Hapi,

who sends the river into the underworld,

so that it might flow through the heavens

then out from between the two mountains

into and across the land.

Everyone says :

Hail to you, Hapi,

Sprung from earth,

Come to nourish us!

Of secret ways,

A darkness by day,

To whom his followers sing !

Who floods the fields that Ra has made,

To nourish all who thirst;

Let’s drink the waterless desert,

His dew descending from the sky.7

Priest 2 stands before altar holding the papyrus in one hand and the lotus in the other. Priest 2 says :

I am Hap-Resent in the South,

I am Hap-Meht in the North.

I am that which flows through both,

bringing them into union as one.

Priest 2, as Hapi, ties the papyrus and lotus together at their centres, then places them in front or next to the image of Hapi on the middle level.

Priest 1, as Khnum, stands before the altar holding up the earthenware jar and says :

The two caves are in a trench below me.

It is up to me to let loose the well.8

Priest 1, as Khnum, begins pouring water from the jar into the blue bowl (but only to the point that it is full...do not let it overflow) while saying :

I know the Nile,

urge him to the field,

I urge him,

life appears in every nose.

As one urges to the field,

I will make the Nile swell for you,

without there being a year of lack and exhaustion in the whole land,

so the plants will flourish, bending under their fruit.9

Priest 2, as Hapi, stands before the altar holding the jar. As Priest 2 begins pouring water from the jar into the blue bowl so that it overflows into and fills the larger bowl, Everyone says :

Establisher of justice !

Mankind desires You,

supplicating You to answer our prayers;

You answer them by the inundation!10

O, Hapi,

Bring the water

of life and nourishment

to our lands.

O, Hapi,

Bring the water

of replenishment with its rich, black silt

to our lands.

O, Hapi,

Bring the water

of healing and renewal

to our lands.

O, Hapi,

Bring the water

that flows forth,

as it did from Nun into creation,

from the heavens to our lands.

O, Hapi,

Bring the water

that flows forth from the darkness of the caverns

to our lands.

O, Hapi,

Bring the water

neither too much nor too little, according to Ma’at,

to our lands.

O, Hapi,

Bring the water !

Bring the water !

Bring the water !

Bring the water !

Priest 1, as Khnum, and Priest 2, as Hapi, hold the food offerings in both hands over the full bowls of water. Priest 1, as Khnum, and Priest 2, as Hapi, both say together :

Renenutet is in all things,

everything will be brought forth by the million,

and everybody, in whose granary there had been dearth.

The land is beginning to stir again,

the shores are shining wonderfully,

and wealth and well-being dwell with them,

as it had been before.11

Offerings are placed on each side of the bowl.

Priest 2, as Hapi, stands before the altar. Priest 2, as Hapi, lights the white candle in front of the bowls of water as Everyone says :

He shines when He issues forth from the darkness,

to cause His flocks to prosper.

It is His force that gives existence to all things;

nothing remains hidden for Him.

He watches over His works, producing the inundation during the night.12

One at a time, each person comes to the altar, takes a blue bottle, fills it with water from the bowl, and takes a stone. Holding the bottle and stone up near the mouth, the following is said to charge and seal them :

Hail to You, O Nile !

Who manifests Yourself over this land,

and comes to give life to me !

Mysterious is Your issuing forth from the darkness,

on this day whereon it is celebrated ! . . .

You give the earth to drink, inexhaustible one !

Where misery existed, joy manifests itself;

all beasts rejoice.

I, NN, a child of Sobek,

I, NN, a son/daughter of Neith, . . .

I, NN, am prosperous !13

My thoughts and words and actions are effective.

My thoughts and words and actions come into being immediately.

Once each person has received and charged their bottle and stone...

Everyone says :

Mighty is Hapi in His cavern,

His name unknown to those below,

For the gods do not reveal it.

We who extol the gods,

Respect the awe His son has made,

The All-Lord who sustains the shores !

Oh joy when You come !

Oh joy when You come, O Hapi,

Oh joy when You come !

You who feed men and herds

With Your meadow gifts !

Oh joy when You come !

Oh joy when You come, O Hapi,

Oh joy when You come !14

The ritual is now complete. There may be clapping, drumming, sistrum shaking, dancing for a few minutes afterward to celebrate and close the ritual.

If calling for rain (inundation) of the land, then the stone might be buried or tossed into a river; similarly, the water in the bottle could be poured out over the land to « start » or call forth the inundation.

If done for a personal inundation or flow of health, prosperity, etc., then the stone could be carried as a talisman and activated when needed by pouring water over it while stating the purpose/need. Similarly, the water in the bottle could be drunk (it need not be a large amount; perhaps a dropper could be used to place a small amount under your tongue). Or it could be used to sprinkle a space or object where flow or inundation is needed (an office, over bills, on a resume, etc), or used as ritual water at a later time.

It is up to you how you use it. But remember, like the inundation, it is not a never ending bottle of water, so use it wisely and in proper proportion in accordance with Ma’at.

Sources:

Meeks, Daily Life of the Egyptian Gods, p. 93. 1

 Meeks, Daily Life of the Egyptian Gods, p. 129. 2

 Meeks, Daily Life of the Egyptian Gods, p. 185 : Daumas, Mammisis, pp. 43-54. 3

 Ibid. 4

Famine Stela at Sehel as quoted by Caroline Seawright in the article, « Khnum, Potter God of the Inundation Silt and 5

Creation » on the website « Tour Egypt » http://www.touregypt.net as of 6 November 2009.

Papyrus Anastasi as quoted on the website http://www.philae.nu/akhet/NetjeruH.html#Hapi as of 6 November 2009. 6

 Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature : A Book of Readings, Vol. 1, The Old and Middle Kingdoms as quoted on the 7

website http://www.cofc.edu/~piccione/nehist270/index.html as of 6 November 2009.

Famine Stela at Sehel as quoted by Caroline Seawright in the article, « Khnum, Potter God of the Inundation Silt and 8

Creation » on the website Tour Egypt http://www.touregypt.net as of 6 November 2009.

 Ibid. 9

 Sayce, ed., Records of the Past, 2nd series, Vol. III, as quoted on the website « Sacred Texts » http://www.sacred- 10

texts.com as of 6 November 2009.

Famine Stela at Sehel as quoted by Caroline Seawright in the article, « Khnum, Potter God of the Inundation Silt and 11

Creation » on the website « Tour Egypt » http://www.touregypt.net as of 6 November 2009.

 Thatcher, ed., The Library of Original Sources, as quoted on the website « Internet Ancient History Sourcebook » http:// 12

www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook.html as of 6 November 2009

 Ibid. The last three lines of the second paragraph have been adapted by the author of this ritual. 13

 Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature : A Book of Readings, Vol. 1, The Old and Middle Kingdoms as quoted on the 14

website http://www.cofc.edu/~piccione/nehist270/index.html as of 6 November 2009.